The Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition

The Annotated Pride and Prejudice: A Revised and Expanded Edition

Language: English

Pages: 816

ISBN: 0307950905

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This Revised and Expanded Edition contains hundreds of new notes and illustrations.

The first-ever fully annotated edition of one of the most beloved novels in the world is a sheer delight for Jane Austen fans. Here is the complete text of Pride and Prejudice with thousands of annotations on facing pages, including:

 • Explanations of historical context

Rules of etiquette, class differences, the position of women, legal and economic realities, leisure activities, and more.

 • Citations from Austen’s life, letters, and other writings

Parallels between the novel and Austen’s experience are revealed, along with writings that illuminate her beliefs and opinions.

 • Definitions and clarifications

Archaic words, words still in use whose meanings have changed, and obscure passages are explained.

 • Literary comments and analyses

Insightful notes highlight Austen’s artistry and point out the subtle ways she develops her characters and themes.

 • Maps and illustrations

of places and objects mentioned in the novel.

 • An introduction, a bibliography, and a detailed chronology of events

 Of course, one can enjoy the novel without knowing the precise definition of a gentleman, or what it signifies that a character drives a coach rather than a hack chaise, or the rules governing social interaction at a ball, but readers of The Annotated Pride and Prejudice will find that these kinds of details add immeasurably to understanding and enjoying the intricate psychological interplay of Austen’s immortal characters.

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extraordinary visit threw Elizabeth into, could not be easily overcome; nor could she for many hours, learn to think of it less than incessantly. Lady Catherine it appeared, had actually taken the trouble of this journey from Rosings, for the sole purpose of breaking off her supposed engagement with Mr. Darcy. It was a rational scheme to be sure! but from what the report of their engagement could originate, Elizabeth was at a loss to imagine; till she recollected that his being the intimate

Mr. Collins’s position with Lady Catherine: he, and any wife of his, are to be invited only when Lady Catherine cannot find better companions. Since quadrille is a card game requiring four players, it would be necessary for Lady Catherine to have some guests in order to form an adequate table. 23. A good example of Elizabeth’s sensible and generally positive approach to life. Such an approach, combining sober acceptance of reality with the attempt always to hope for the best, is one Jane Austen

her wedding, but she had no basis for connecting that with Darcy’s feelings for Elizabeth. In fact, Jane’s general lack of suspicion about other people means that she would be one of the last to guess a difficult secret; she would be especially unlikely to suspect that her own favorite sister, with whom she was generally so intimate, would have been harboring a strong romantic passion and keeping it from everyone. 6. A statement expressing Jane Austen’s own deepest feelings. In a letter to her

continued however impenetrably grave. She looked at her father to entreat his interference, lest Mary should be singing all night. He took the hint, and when Mary had finished her second song, said aloud, “That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.” Mary, though pretending not to hear, was somewhat disconcerted; and Elizabeth sorry for her, and sorry for her father’s speech, was afraid her anxiety had done no

much deference.” The evening was spent chiefly in talking over Hertfordshire news, and telling again what had been already written; and when it closed, Elizabeth in the solitude of her chamber had to meditate upon Charlotte’s degree of contentment, to understand her address23 in guiding, and composure in bearing with her husband, and to acknowledge that it was all done very well. She had also to anticipate how her visit would pass, the quiet tenor of their usual employments, the vexatious

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