The American Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850 to 1890

The American Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850 to 1890

Jeff Wallenfeldt, Britannica Educational Publishing

Language: English

Pages: 174

ISBN: 2:00171020

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


While the United States represents freedom to many, much of its history tragically includes the enslavement of a large portion of its population. When the fight for emancipation came to an epic head, civil war ensued and the country was divided as never before. Inflamed passions on both sides of the slavery debate inspired fervent rhetoric, much of which is reflected in the primary source documents interspersed with the text in this thought-provoking volume, which chronicles the events of the American Civil War and the Reconstruction period that followed.

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Donelson by abandoning their strong position at Columbus, Ky., and by evacuating Nashville. Grant’s next aim was to attack the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and to this end he encamped his troops on the Tennessee at Pittsburg Landing. At this point Gen. A.S. Johnston, commanding Confederate forces in the West, and General Beauregard were collecting a force aimed at recovering some of their recent losses. Since Union troops were planning an offensive, they had not fortified their camps. On

We gained by honest toil; And when our rights were threatened, The cry rose near and far— “Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star!” Chorus: Hurrah! hurrah! For Southern rights, hurrah! Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star.… Union field hospital, Savage’s Station, Va. photograph by James F. Gibson, June 30, 1862. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. (LC-B8171-0491 DLC) At the Second Battle of Bull Run (August 29–30), Lee drove another

party of the free state men, fitting them out with such weapons as he had; telling them that if the troubles should increase and there should be need of him, he would follow to assist them with his hand and counsel. This, as you all know, he soon after did; and it was through his agency, far more than any other’s, that Kansas was made free. … I should say that he was an old-fashioned man in his respect for the Constitution and his faith in the permanence of this Union. Slavery he deemed to be

were threatened, The cry rose near and far— “Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star!” Chorus: Hurrah! hurrah! For Southern rights, hurrah! Hurrah for the Bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star. As long as the Union Was faithful to her trust, Like friends and like brothers Both kind were we and just; But now, when Northern treachery Attempts our rights to mar, We hoist on high the Bonnie Blue Flag That bears the single star. First gallant South

stricken man utters as the bullet tears through his flesh. I turned my head, as I loaded my rifle, to see who was hit. I saw a bearded Irishman pull up his shirt. He had been wounded in the left side just below the floating ribs. His face was gray with fear. The wound looked as though it were mortal. He looked at it for an instant, then poked it gently with his index finger. He flushed redly and smiled with satisfaction. He tucked his shirt into his trousers and was fighting in the ranks again

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