Stage Fright on a Summer Night (Magic Tree House #25)

Stage Fright on a Summer Night (Magic Tree House #25)

Mary Pope Osborne

Language: English

Pages: 96

ISBN: 0375806113

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Jack and Annie are ready for their next fantasy adventure in the bestselling middle-grade series—the Magic Tree House!

The show must go on!

That's what Jack and Annie learn when the Magic Tree House whisks them back to Elizabethan England. There they meet William Shakespeare himself—one of the greatest writers of all time! But Mr. Shakespeare's having a hard time with some of the actors in his latest show. Are Jack and Annie ready to make a big entrance? Or will it be curtains for Shakespeare?

Visit the Magic Tree House website!
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Ruby Fuzzybrush's Star Dance (Magic Animal Friends, Book 7)

Junie B., First Grader: Toothless Wonder (Junie B. Jones, Book 20)

Horrid Henry Wakes the Dead

The Black Stallion Mystery (Black Stallion, Book 13)

Ms. Hannah Is Bananas! (My Weird School, Book 4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and Annie sat on their porch. Lightning bugs blinked in the warm summer twilight. “Wow, a shooting star!” said Annie, pointing at the sky. Jack looked up, just in time to see a streak of light flash through the sky. The light hovered above the Frog Creek woods. Then it disappeared into the treetops. Jack caught his breath. He turned to Annie. “That was no shooting star,” he said. “Right,” she said. They jumped up. Jack grabbed his backpack from inside the front hall. “Dad, Mom! Can we go

and Annie sat on their porch. Lightning bugs blinked in the warm summer twilight. “Wow, a shooting star!” said Annie, pointing at the sky. Jack looked up, just in time to see a streak of light flash through the sky. The light hovered above the Frog Creek woods. Then it disappeared into the treetops. Jack caught his breath. He turned to Annie. “That was no shooting star,” he said. “Right,” she said. They jumped up. Jack grabbed his backpack from inside the front hall. “Dad, Mom! Can we go

over to the cart. In the back of it was a cage. In the cage was a big brown bear. The bear was slumped over, his head still down. The sign on the cart said DAN THE DANCING BEAR. “Dan?” Annie asked. “Are you going to fight?” The lonely-looking bear raised his huge head and looked at Annie. His dark eyes were sad. He let out a low moan. “I understand,” Annie said. “You don’t want to fight. You’re asking me to take you away.” Annie reached for the door of the bear’s cage. “Away with you!”

not a single groundling hissed or threw things. Jack took a deep breath as Puck started his lines. Jack knew he had one more speech. His heart pounded. But it was more from excitement now than fear. When it was time to start his second speech, he was ready. This time, he spoke very clearly and with feeling. He tried to be as natural as possible. When he finished his speech, the audience clapped and clapped. Jack hardly remembered leaving the stage. Will was waiting for him. “Hurrah!” said

said Annie. “Why does Queen Elizabeth have black teeth?” “Too much sugar,” said Will. “I hope it doesn’t make her feel bad—looking that way, I mean,” said Annie. “Oh, no, she’s not the least hurt,” said Will. “The queen has no idea how she looks. She hasn’t peeked in a good mirror for twenty years.” “Is that true?” said Annie. “ ’Tis,” said Will. “The queen pretends to be young and beautiful. Just as you pretended to be a boy, and the bear pretended to be an actor. You see, all the world’s a

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