Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen

Language: English

Pages: 310

ISBN: 145651010X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Sense and Sensibility with b&w illustrations. Sense and Sensibility is a novel by the English novelist Jane Austen. Published in 1811, it was Austen's first published novel, which she wrote under the pseudonym "A Lady". The story is about Elinor and Marianne, two daughters of Mr Dashwood by his second wife. They have a younger sister, Margaret, and an older half-brother named John. When their father dies, the family estate passes to John, and the Dashwood women are left in reduced circumstances. The novel follows the Dashwood sisters to their new home, a cottage on a distant relative's property, where they experience both romance and heartbreak. The contrast between the sisters' characters is eventually resolved as they each find love and lasting happiness. Through the events in the novel, Elinor and Marianne encounter the sense and sensibility of life and love.

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measure quieted it, and I had been growing a fine hardened villain, fancying myself indifferent to her, and chusing to fancy that she too must have become indifferent to me; talking to myself of our past attachment as a mere idle, trifling business, shrugging up my shoulders in proof of its being so, and silencing every reproach, overcoming every scruple, by secretly saying now and then, ‘I shall be heartily glad to hear she is well married.’ But this note made me know myself better. I felt that

who sat with her head leaning over her work, in a state of such agitation as made her hardly know where she was. “Yes,” said he, “they were married last week, and are now at Dawlish.” Elinor could sit it no longer. She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease. Edward, who had till then looked any where, rather than at her, saw her hurry away, and perhaps saw—or even heard, her emotion; for immediately

as ever, you see,” said Elinor, “she is not at all altered.” “She is only grown a little more grave than she was.” “Nay, Edward,” said Marianne, “you need not reproach me. You are not very gay yourself.” “Why should you think so!” replied he, with a sigh. “But gaiety never was a part of MY character.” “Nor do I think it a part of Marianne’s,” said Elinor; “I should hardly call her a lively girl-she is very earnest, very eager in all she does—sometimes talks a great deal and always with

better for Marianne than an immediate return into Devonshire. Her carefulness in guarding her sister from ever hearing Willoughby’s name mentioned, was not thrown away. Marianne, though without knowing it herself, reaped all its advantage; for neither Mrs. Jennings, nor Sir John, nor even Mrs. Palmer herself, ever spoke of him before her. Elinor wished that the same forbearance could have extended towards herself, but that was impossible, and she was obliged to listen day after day to the

out of her sister-in-law’s hands, to admire them herself as they ought to be admired. Mrs. Ferrars looked exceedingly angry, and drawing herself up more stiffly than ever, pronounced in retort this bitter philippic, “Miss Morton is Lord Morton’s daughter.” Fanny looked very angry too, and her husband was all in a fright at his sister’s audacity. Elinor was much more hurt by Marianne’s warmth than she had been by what produced it; but Colonel Brandon’s eyes, as they were fixed on Marianne,

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