Northanger Abbey [Special Illustrated Edition] [Annotated with Literary History And Criticism ] [Free Audio Links]

Northanger Abbey [Special Illustrated Edition] [Annotated with Literary History And Criticism ] [Free Audio Links]

Language: English

Pages: 0

ISBN: B00F57LQ24

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Northanger Abbey was the first of Jane Austen's novels to be completed for publication, though she had previously made a start on Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice. According to Cassandra Austen's Memorandum, Susan (as it was first called) was written approximately during 1798–99. It was revised by Austen for the press in 1803, and sold in the same year for £10 to a London bookseller, Crosby & Co., who decided against publishing. In 1817, the bookseller was content to sell it back to the novelist's brother, Henry Austen, for the exact sum — £10 — that he had paid for it at the beginning, not knowing that the writer was by then the author of four popular novels. The novel was further revised before being brought out posthumously in late December 1817 (1818 given on the title-page), as the first two volumes of a four-volume set with Persuasion.

[Adaptations]

Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

The A&E Network and the BBC released the television adaptation Northanger Abbey in 1986.
An adaptation of Northanger Abbey with screenplay by Andrew Davies, was shown on ITV on 25 March 2007 as part of their "Jane Austen Season". This adaptation aired on PBS in the United States as part of the "Complete Jane Austen" on Masterpiece Classic in January 2008.
"Pup Fiction" – an episode of Wishbone featuring the plot and characters of Austen's Northanger Abbey.

Literature

In 2012, it was announced that HarperCollins had hired Scottish crime writer Val McDermid to adapt Northanger Abbey for a modern audience, as a suspenseful teen thriller. McDermid said of the project, "At its heart it's a teen novel, and a satire - that's something which fits really well with contemporary fiction. And you can really feel a shiver of fear moving through it. I will be keeping the suspense – I know how to keep the reader on the edge of their seat. I think Jane Austen builds suspense well in a couple of places, but she squanders it, and she gets to the endgame too quickly. So I will be working on those things."

Far from the Madding Crowd

Glue (Terry Lawson, Book 1)

Jane Eyre (Oxford World’s Classics)

Hangover Square: A Story of Darkest Earl's Court (Penguin Modern Classics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

be five and twenty,” said he, “by the time we have been doing it. It is now half after one; we drove out of the inn-yard at Tetbury as the town clock struck eleven; and I defy any man in England to make my horse go less than ten miles an hour in harness; that makes it exactly twenty-five.” “You have lost an hour,” said Morland; “it was only ten o’clock when we came from Tetbury.” “Ten o’clock! It was eleven, upon my soul! I counted every stroke. This brother of yours would persuade me out of

get ready. In a very few minutes she reappeared, having scarcely allowed the two others time enough to get through a few short sentences in her praise, after Thorpe had procured Mrs. Allen’s admiration of his gig; and then receiving her friend’s parting good wishes, they both hurried downstairs. “My dearest creature,” cried Isabella, to whom the duty of friendship immediately called her before she could get into the carriage, “you have been at least three hours getting ready. I was afraid you

concealed; her fancy, though it had trespassed lately once or twice, could not mislead her here; and what that something was, a short sentence of Miss Tilney’s, as they followed the general at some distance downstairs, seemed to point out: “I was going to take you into what was my mother’s room, the room in which she died—” were all her words; but few as they were, they conveyed pages of intelligence to Catherine. It was no wonder that the general should shrink from the sight of such objects as

had passed he had little right to expect a welcome at Fullerton, and stating his impatience to be assured of Miss Morland’s having reached her home in safety, as the cause of his intrusion. He did not address himself to an uncandid judge or a resentful heart. Far from comprehending him or his sister in their father’s misconduct, Mrs. Morland had been always kindly disposed towards each, and instantly, pleased by his appearance, received him with the simple professions of unaffected benevolence;

reply, the meaning, which one short syllable would have given, immediately expressed his intention of paying his respects to them, and, with a rising colour, asked her if she would have the goodness to show him the way. “You may see the house from this window, sir,” was information on Sarah’s side, which produced only a bow of acknowledgment from the gentleman, and a silencing nod from her mother; for Mrs. Morland, thinking it probable, as a secondary consideration in his wish of waiting on their

Download sample

Download