Managing Allergens in Food (Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition)

Managing Allergens in Food (Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition)

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 1845690281

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Controlling allergens in food is a matter of increasing importance for the food industry, especially in light of recent legislation. Effective handling of allergens depends on identifying allergenic ingredients, creating separate production lines for allergen-free products, and effective labelling to inform consumers about which products are safe to eat. Recent attention has also focused on novel methods to manage allergens in food, for example by reducing allergenicity through the prudent selection of raw food materials and improved processing techniques. This important collection provides a clear introduction to food allergens and allergy and offers a comprehensive review of current research contributing to safer food production with regard to allergens.

Part one discusses the diagnosis of offending foods and how allergens can affect the quality of life. Expanding on these fundamentals, part two reviews the effect of different methods of food processing on allergens and novel technologies which can reduce the potency of allergens or remove them altogether from foods. The final part of the book covers the key area of risk assessment and allergen management to achieve more uniform standards within the industry. Practical strategies to improve consumer acceptance of GM foods are also discussed.

With its distinguished editors and array of international contributors, Managing allergens in food is an essential reference for producers, manufacturers, retailers and all those wishing to improve safety in the food industry.

  • Presents a cohesive summary of recent research into safer food production
  • Discusses the effects of food processing on allergens
  • An international team of editors

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for food allergic patients who present with severe anaphylactic reactions and have difficulties in following the elimination diet because of exposure to hidden allergens, and are thus at risk of health-threatening or even fatal reactions. This is the case with peanut allergy. However, subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) to peanut is currently not recommended because the risk/benefit ratio is considered unacceptable. Although peanut SCIT increased tolerance to peanut assessed by DBPCFC, and reduced

37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 23 sesame as a major cause of severe IgE-mediated food allergic reactions among infants and young children in Israel. Allergy, 2002, 57(4): 362–5. RANCÉ F, KANNY G, DUTAU G, MONERET-VAUTRIN D A. Food hypersensitivity in children: clinical aspects and distribution of allergens. Pediatr Allergy Immunol, 1999, 10(1): 33–8. ALERGIA A ALIMENTOS. In: Alergológica. Factores Epidemiológicos, Clínicos y Socioeconómicos de las Enfermedades Alérgicas en España. Sociedad

. . . 17.5 Communication with health professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.6 Communication with food authorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.7 Communication with food retailers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.8 Communication with food manufacturers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.9 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.10 Future trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

topographical similarity comparisons, taking into account not only the shape of the surface but also the properties of the surface with its charges and hydrophobic and hydrophilic characteristics. However, our ability to predict the potential of a protein to sensitise using in silico methods has yet to be tackled and is hampered by our lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying sensitisation. 4.5 Structural approaches to reducing allergenic potential of foods 4.5.1 Altering allergenic

(e.g. Bet v 1 homologues, profilins) to the digestion process. Due to the high prevalence of pollinosis in the adult population, and its frequent association with plant food allergies, OAS is the most frequent clinical presentation of food allergy seen in adult patients.16,27,31,42 8 Managing allergens in food 1.3.4 Gastrointestinal reactions Food allergic reactions in the gastrointestinal tract may induce symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. They often accompany

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